Agent Orange Cranberry Compote

This article appears in Volume 9 – Issue 4 of SKUNK Magazine.

Agent Orange Cranberry Compote
Yields 3
Winter is fast approaching for many, but for some frost has already been kissing their cheeks. With the passage of Halloween, All Saints Day, and Daylight Savings Time, the daylight is starting to wane. Up in the High Country, all the ski resorts have an impressive snow base making snowboarders and skiers very happy. With the changing of the seasons, people are starting to create traditional comfort foods, reigniting that well-known nostalgic sensation. What presents are being given to family and friends during the holidays? What is going to be served during the Thanksgiving and New Year’s feasts? Well, I have a solution for you, and it is called Agent Orange Cranberry Compote. When European’s landed ashore, they were introduced to cranberries by the Native American’s. The Native tribes would preserve cranberries mixed with a dried meat mix (called Pemmican) that helped them get through the long New England winters. Word of a sweet tasting cranberry sauce in 1663 became talk among visitors the area. Cranberry sauce began to catch on throughout history and many people used it during the winter festivities. In 1912, cranberry sauce became commercially marketed for the first time. There has been a long love affair with this sauce, and it can be enjoyed through a variation of applications. Agent Orange is the delicious cross of Orange Velvet and Jack the Ripper. The culinary applications of the terpenes and medicinal effects in this strain should be highly sought after in the kitchen. This strain lends a sweet but spicy orange peel flavor with a slight hint of lemon. This really enhances the citrus flavors of the cranberries, clementine’s, and orange juice. Seal or can in jars to give out as gifts to family or friends, even perhaps to someone in need. Enjoy at the dinner table with your loved ones that will be sure to elevate any dinner party. Or even make this delicious compote for yourself because you deserve it.
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  1. 24 ounces fresh cranberries (or frozen)
  2. 3 large clementine oranges
  3. 1 1/4 cup coconut sugar
  4. 1 cup water
  5. 1/2 cup orange juice concentrate
  6. 1/2 cup Mascato
  7. 1-2 grams Agent Orange hash oil (BHO extraction)
  8. 3 tbsp Grand Marnier
  9. 1 tbsp Earth Balance Coconut Oil spread
  10. 1 1/4 tsp cornstarch
To cook
  1. Preheat your oven to 220 degrees. Add the Agent Orange Hash Oil to a ramiken and bake for 10 minutes. Open the oven and add the coconut oil to the hash oil making sure to stir. Continue to bake for another 15 minutes.
  2. When you are at the 10 minute mark from the start of baking the Agent Orange Hash Oil, pull out a heavy stock pot and place it on the stove. Take the clementine’s and zest all three of them. Add the cranberries, coconut sugar, orange juice mascato, 1 cup water, 2 tablespoons Grand Marnier, and zest. Now hand squeeze the clementine’s juice into the pot (it is ok if some pulp gets in there).
  3. When you are at the 5 minute mark, bring the uncovered cranberry mixture up to a full boil. After the 5 minute mark, pull the decarboxylized Agent Orange Hash Oil from the oven and add to the boiling mixture. Stir with a spoon, cover the pot and reduce to a simmer for 40 minutes.
  4. After 40 minutes, uncover then add 1 tablespoon of Grand Marnier and the cornstarch. Continue to let the mixture simmer, uncovered, for another 20 minutes. If you want to preserve this Agent Orange Cranberry Compote through “canning” process (resulting in a fun gift with a storage period of up to one year) then start the process described below when you hit the 20 minute mark. When the final 20 minutes are over, you are all done! The “canning” process is outlined further in this article.
  5. Serve the compote warm during the holidays or preserve through “canning” for gifts to your loved ones. To give as gifts, measure out into mason jars evenly and seal the jars making sure there is no air in the jar. Keep the gifts refrigerated and let people know who are receiving them that it will last 4 days.
To can
  1. Add the desired amount of mason jars to hot soapy water in the sink. Let this sit for ten minutes. Take a stock pot and add cold water. Take a clean hand towel that will cover the entire bottom of the stock pot. Get the towel wet and evenly distribute over the bottom. Turn the stove to the highest temperature and bring to a boil.
  2. When the water is boiling, lift the mason jars out of the soapy water and rise off any soap with warm water. Add the jars carefully into the boiling water and cover for 15 minutes. Keep your compote on the stove on the lowest setting for the extra 5 minutes until you are ready to transfer. When this is done, pull out the jars and lids with tongs then place onto a clean sterile towel.
  3. Quickly transfer the Agent Orange Cranberry Compote into sterile jars of your choice. Fill the jars to the first ring in the jar leaving about ½ inch of space. Carefully clean the top of the rim with a clean paper towel and transfer the lid to the top without touching it with your hands (use sterile tongs). Screw on the ring secure but not too tight as you want the air bubbles to come out of the jar as the food expands. Add the jar or jars (depending on what size you have) to the same boiling hot water. Make sure the jars are only touching the wet cloth on the bottom, not the metal. Cover and take it to a rolling boil for the time specified below.
  4. Pull from the water when the time is up and place onto the same sterile cloth. Be sure to pull it straight out of the water and do not tip the jar. Gently loosen the ring but not all the way, just enough for air to get in to dry it. Let the canned Agent Orange Cranberry Compote rest out at room temperature for a full 24 hours. The jars should have sealed by this time, once way to check them is to press down with your finger. If it is bouncy and makes a clicking sound, the jar was not sealed properly. If this happens, just place in the refrigerator and consume within a week or you can re-can them. If they sealed properly, store in a cool dark place until you are ready to consume it or give it away. So long as you used sterile equipment during this process and followed the steps carefully, you can store this up to a year. If for some reason the Agent Orange Cranberry Compote went rancid it was because of contamination. Do not eat the compote if it visually appears off, smells strange, or has grown strange creatures when you open it. If this happens, promptly throw it away as Botchalism has developed and can be fatal if consumed
SKUNK Magazine
1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Terry

    April 8, 2016 at 10:02 am

    wow looks delicious and recipe is quite easy to undertand. will try it out with family when i get home

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